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You are here : AllRefer.com > Health > Surgery & Procedures > Gastric bypass surgery : Pictures & Images

Gastric bypass surgery

Alternate Names : Bariatric surgery - gastric bypass, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, Gastric bypass - Roux-en-Y


Pictures & Images

Roux-en-Y stomach surgery for weight loss
Roux-en-Y stomach surgery for weight loss

The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure involves creating a stomach pouch out of a small portion of the stomach and attaching it directly to the small intestine, bypassing a large part of the stomach and duodenum. Not only is the stomach pouch too small to hold large amounts of food, but by skipping the duodenum, fat absorption is substantially reduced.

Adjustable gastric banding
Adjustable gastric banding

Restrictive gastric operations, such as an adjustable gastric banding procedure, serve only to restrict and decrease food intake and do not interfere with the normal digestive process.

In this procedure, a hollow band made of special material is placed around the stomach near its upper end, creating the small pouch and a narrow passage into the larger remaining portion of the stomach. This small passage delays the emptying of food from the pouch and causes a feeling of fullness.

The band can be tightened or loosened over time to change the size of the passage. Initially, the pouch holds about 1 ounce of food and later expands to 2-3 ounces.

Vertical banded gastroplasty
Vertical banded gastroplasty

Restrictive gastric operations, such as vertical banded gastroplasty (VGB), serve only to restrict and decrease food intake and do not interfere with the normal digestive process.

In this procedure the upper stomach near the esophagus is stapled vertically to create a small pouch along the inner curve of the stomach. The outlet from the pouch to the rest of the stomach is restricted by a band made of special material. The band delays the emptying of food from the pouch, causing a feeling of fullness.

Biliopancreatic diversion (BPD)
Biliopancreatic diversion (BPD)

Malabsorptive operations, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), restrict both food intake and the amount of calories and nutrients the body absorbs.

In a BPD procedure, portions of the stomach are removed. The small pouch that remains is connected directly to the final segment of the small intestine, completely bypassing the upper part of the small intestines. A common channel remains in which bile and pancreatic digestive juices mix prior to entering the colon. Weight loss occurs since most of the calories and nutrients are routed into the colon where they are not absorbed.

Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch
Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch

Malabsorptive operations restrict both food intake and the amount of calories and nutrients the body absorbs.

In this procedure, a larger portion of the stomach is left intact, including the pyloric valve that regulates the release of contents from the stomach into the small intestine. The duodenum is divided near this valve, and the small intestine divided as well. The portion of the small intestine connected to large intestine is attached to the short duodenal segment next to the stomach. The remaining segment of the duodenum connected to the pancreas and gallbladder is attached to this limb closer to the large intestine. Where contents from these two segments mix is called the common channel, which dumps into the large intestine.

Dumping syndrome
Dumping syndrome

Dumping syndrome occurs when the contents of the stomach empty too quickly into the small intestine. The partially digested food draws excess fluid into the small intestine causing nausea, cramping, diarrhea, sweating, faintness, and palpitations. Dumping usually occurs after the consumption of too much simple or refined sugar in people who have had surgery to modify or remove all or part of the stomach.





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